The Babylonian Religion

Screen Shot 2019-05-22 at 6.17.44 PM.png

Babylonia was located in the Mesopotamian region (present-day Iraq between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers), and was where communities first evolved into towns and cities. As the settlements grew so did the social structures, as well as the cultural and religious beliefs of the people — all of which came to unify the people and bolster a political system.

When the Babylonians first settled in Mesopotamia (after the 3rd millennium BC), they imbibed the beliefs, mythologies, and culture of the Sumerian people who were living in the area before them. The Sumerian people believed in a pantheon of gods of whom they worshiped. The Babylonians incorporated Sumerian belief and mythology into their own empire, and the powerful Babylonian leaders used it as a means to reinforce their dominance and the hierarchy they established. For the Babylonians, religion provided them with a coherent mythology, and was of huge importance for it not only served social and functions but also explained the natural world and phenomena.

Foundational to Babylonian religion is the well-known creation myth Enuma Elish. The story is very old (dating somewhere between 1894-1595 BC), receives its information from earlier Sumerian mythology, and is recorded on several clay tablets. It speaks of a before time in which only Tiamat (the saltwater ocean) and Apsu (the freshwater ocean) existed. Tiamat and Apsu give birth to the primal gods, including Anshar and Kishu, the horizons of the sky, and the Earth. The sky and the Earth then create Anu (the god of the sky) and Ea (the god of the earth and water). The shouts of the young gods disturb the peace as well as Tiamat and Apsu. Apsu attempts to destroy the young gods but is killed by Ea. At this time Ea also creates a temple for himself, which he names Apsu (named after his father), where his son, Marduk, is born. In attempt to avenge the death of her husband, Tiamat wages war against Marduk, and puts her son Qingu in command of her forces. However, Marduk fights Tiamat’s army killing both Qingu and Tiamat. Through these events order is brought back to the universe, and from Qingu’s blood, Marduk creates mankind to serve the gods.

The Babylonians adapted the Sumerian story and reworked it to have it feature Babylonian deities, and in particular the god Marduk, the son of the god Enki. Marduk is also the leader of a hierarchy of gods, whose victory over the older gods, including the creator god Tiamat, gave him the power to create and organize the universe which he ruled from Babylon. This story of Marduk ordering the universe and his victory over the other gods is a metaphor for the power, authority, and supremacy of Babylonian rulers and kings, and their right to enforce laws.

The King Hammurabi (c. 1810 – c. 1750 BC), of whom many believed was a god, claimed divine authority for his rule and introduced a code of laws known as the Code of Hammurabi. From his wealthy and powerful city base of Babylon, King Hammurabi spread his empire, conquered new territories, and forced the people to pay respect to the god Marduk. Babylon not only acted as an administrative center for Babylonia but was also its religious center in which Marduk and Hammurabi asserted their supremacy over others by establishing a hierarchy of gods and men. Around 691 BC, Babylon fell to the Assyrians, and the myths of Marduk were reassigned to the Assyrian god Assur.

References

Ambalu, S. et al. 2013. The Religions Book. p. 56-67

Encyclopedia Britannica. Babylon: Ancient City, Mesopotamia, Asia. Available.

7 responses to “The Babylonian Religion

  1. I added several comments, apparently you must approve them first, either because they include a link or they are more than a hundred words long or something like that, whatever your default settings are for approval needed before posting. Of course you need not post this comment nor my earlier test.

    • Try commenting again. I checked the comments queue and there’s nothing there. Are you perhaps spamming? Maybe wordpress is picking this up and trashing the comments coming through.

      • What does it consider spamming? The inclusion of a link? I guess you also didn’t receive my comments the last time You said something naive about Babylonian religion compared with Israelite. Your comments elsewhere on your blog that you don’t believe in old mythical gods but you believe in Yahweh, are naive,

      • I suspect you have some settings that do not allow posts beyond a certain number of words, or if they include a link. And when I tried resending it told me that I had already said that. Sure there are no other queues you might check to see if my posts were shunted there?

      • Tried reposting this, but it keeps coming up duplicate comment detected

        What does it consider spamming? The inclusion of a link? I guess you also didn’t receive my comments the last time You said something naive about Babylonian religion compared with Israelite. Your comments elsewhere on your blog that you don’t believe in old mythical gods but you believe in Yahweh, are naive,

      • My comments are definitely in a queue waiting to be accepted by you before posting, just tried posting one long comment I had saved in my personal Notes. WordPress gave me the same message that it was a duplicate.

Let me know your thoughts!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s